September 3rd, 2011

So a U.S. District Court Judge in Texas just issued an injunction temporarily blocking this law from taking effect today, but if Gov. Rick Perry became president, not only would he be in favor of legislation like this but he’d take it a step further:

Last week, he joined Rick Santorum and Michele Bachmann in signing the Susan B. Anthony List’s Pro-Life pledge, which commits him, among other things, to restricting his Cabinet appointments to people who share his opposition to abortion, something neither Bush nor Ronald Reagan ever did.

(Source: cheatsheet)

September 1st, 2011
“Today, my ACLU connection would probably disqualify me,” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told students at a lecture series at Southern Methodist University’s law school. 
Before being nominated to the court in 1993 by Clinton (and confirmed 96-3), Ginsburg had spent time working as the Director of the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project. These days, she says, her work as a women’s rights attorney for the civil rights organization would prevent her from being confirmed by this Senate. 

ThinkProgress calls her “the single most important women’s rights attorney in American history” for her work with the ACLU. She was instrumental, as they note, in two particular cases: Reed v Reed and Craig v Boren. The first case marked the first instance in which SCOTUS ruled that the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment applied to women. The second case resulted in a ruling declaring that gender discrimation laws “were subject to heightened constitutional scrutiny.” Her role in creating a legal framework for gender equality in the United States has been unparalleled and indispensable. And that would probably mean that she would not be confirmed today.

Above: Via ThinkProgress, Ginsburg during her time with the ACLU.

“Today, my ACLU connection would probably disqualify me,” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told students at a lecture series at Southern Methodist University’s law school.

Before being nominated to the court in 1993 by Clinton (and confirmed 96-3), Ginsburg had spent time working as the Director of the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project. These days, she says, her work as a women’s rights attorney for the civil rights organization would prevent her from being confirmed by this Senate. 

ThinkProgress calls her “the single most important women’s rights attorney in American history” for her work with the ACLU. She was instrumental, as they note, in two particular cases: Reed v Reed and Craig v Boren. The first case marked the first instance in which SCOTUS ruled that the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment applied to women. The second case resulted in a ruling declaring that gender discrimation laws “were subject to heightened constitutional scrutiny.” Her role in creating a legal framework for gender equality in the United States has been unparalleled and indispensable. And that would probably mean that she would not be confirmed today.

Above: Via ThinkProgress, Ginsburg during her time with the ACLU.

(Source: thinkprogress.org, via eckleburgs-eyes)