October 9th, 2011
It was just a little more than a century and a half ago when Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace explained how all the species on Earth could be the product of ancestor- descendant relationships. It was the most important discovery that has been made in science - more important than the discovery that the Earth revolves around the sun, more important than the realization that the Universe is billions of years old, more important even than the discovery of the constituents of the atom. The recognition of biological evolution completely overturned how humans thought about themselves and their relation to the rest of the universe. It’s no wonder that many people still have not reconciled themselves with the implications of evolution

— Greg Graffin, Evolutionary biologist, Anarchy Evolution, p.37 - Making sense of life

(via cwnl)

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi, via nutopiancitizen)

So that’s why old books smell so good….
(via world-shaker)

So that’s why old books smell so good….

(via world-shaker)

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

September 30th, 2011
A danger to society?

In honor of Banned Book Week, here are a few popular books that made the list of the American Library Association’s Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009. 

(Yup, Harry Potter, Toni Morrison, Judy Blume and Harper Lee make appearances, among many others)

(PHOTO: LANSING PUBLIC LIBRARY VIA FLICKR)
(via newshour)

A danger to society?

In honor of Banned Book Week, here are a few popular books that made the list of the American Library Association’s Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

(Yup, Harry Potter, Toni Morrison, Judy Blume and Harper Lee make appearances, among many others)

(PHOTO: LANSING PUBLIC LIBRARY VIA FLICKR)

(via newshour)

September 26th, 2011
Growing Libraries
In the investigative documentary Food, Inc. viewers learn that agricultural corporations harass and intimidate farmers who try to save  patented soybean seeds. This makes it difficult for local growers to  develop their own crops, which requires that seeds from the strongest  plants are saved year to year. As if in response, a small number of  public libraries around the country are beginning to do for seeds what  they have long done for books.

Growing Libraries

In the investigative documentary Food, Inc. viewers learn that agricultural corporations harass and intimidate farmers who try to save patented soybean seeds. This makes it difficult for local growers to develop their own crops, which requires that seeds from the strongest plants are saved year to year. As if in response, a small number of public libraries around the country are beginning to do for seeds what they have long done for books.

(Source: utnereader)

September 21st, 2011
Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge.

— Carl Sagan

In fact, there is no upper-case ‘Science.’ There is only the ‘Scientific Method.’ And that’s what makes science and religion so incompatible.

(via cwnl)

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

September 13th, 2011
Shakespeare in Kandahar


It was Sept. 13, 2001, and I was 21 years old. Two days earlier, I had walked into Kastan’s Shakespeare class before the attacks began and walked out after the second tower had already fallen. Columbia canceled classes for two days. I spent my time at the daily student newspaper, the Spectator, where I was managing editor.On Thursday morning, the first class back was Shakespeare. Professor Kastan continued:


“I will not make a political statement today. But I will say this: This play we will discuss today is about revenge — and what demanding revenge can do to a person. I only hope that the people who will be making decisions on how to respond to Tuesday’s attacks read Titus Andronicus.”

(via utnereader and Foreign Policy)

Shakespeare in Kandahar

It was Sept. 13, 2001, and I was 21 years old. Two days earlier, I had walked into Kastan’s Shakespeare class before the attacks began and walked out after the second tower had already fallen. Columbia canceled classes for two days. I spent my time at the daily student newspaper, the Spectator, where I was managing editor.On Thursday morning, the first class back was Shakespeare. Professor Kastan continued:

“I will not make a political statement today. But I will say this: This play we will discuss today is about revenge — and what demanding revenge can do to a person. I only hope that the people who will be making decisions on how to respond to Tuesday’s attacks read Titus Andronicus.”

(via utnereader and Foreign Policy)

September 1st, 2011
Mind Your Manners: A few dos and don’ts of the global dinner-party scene from the Lapham’s Quarterly Food issue.


DO arrive an hour late for dinner in Japan. 

DON’T cut your salad with a knife in France.

Mind Your Manners: A few dos and don’ts of the global dinner-party scene from the Lapham’s Quarterly Food issue.

DO arrive an hour late for dinner in Japan. 

DON’T cut your salad with a knife in France.

(Source: laphamsquarterly)

August 13th, 2011
The Harry Potter characters, places and themes explained by someone who has never read the books, and has never seen any of the movies, except for recently seeing The Deathly Hallows, Part 2 in a cinema. Very funny.
(via world-shaker)

The Harry Potter characters, places and themes explained by someone who has never read the books, and has never seen any of the movies, except for recently seeing The Deathly Hallows, Part 2 in a cinema. Very funny.

(via world-shaker)

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)